Le vieux Lille

 

Before we begin, a few words about technical perfection. Currently, I use an iPhone 3GS, which everyone agrees, does not have a great camera. Many iPhoneographers utilise apps designed to extend the capability of iPhone cameras but as I like to make images that look flawed in some way, I find that it helps if I begin with a less than perfect photograph. That way, any under or over-exposed areas, motion blur and odd reflections inform my compositional and processing choices. They also give me a head-start in the grunge stakes.

 

 

Resize, crop and recolour

 

Before importing an image into this app, check the export resolution settings: Splash Screen>Options>Resolution (I choose high so that I can print the image if I wish).Once you’ve imported a photograph, you can resize/crop it within the app before browsing through 100 poetically-named presets, grouped into sets of ten.


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Once you’ve imported the image into 100 Cameras in 1, choose the preset ZEN>"where the thunderdome shook the earth."

 

Once again, before importing a photograph into this app, select the Resolution button on the splash screen to set your desired output resolution. In effects choose Aged.

 

The preview screen displays the photo with applied effect and offers further opportunities to modify it. Select Style>Block Party. 

 

Select Strength and adjust with the slider. Bring image into Photogene.

 

Rotate image in Photogene and save to camera roll. 

I incorporate rotation into my work flow so that any generic app presets such as grunge effects and light leaks won’t be applied in the same areas of every single image and hopefully, the apps used will be less recognisable.

After the rotation in Photogene (below, left) we will adjust colour and add extra texture in PictureShow. Bring image into PictureShow and choose INDIGO HALO as shown (below right).


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Still in PictureShow, select the icon at the bottom of your iphone screen named Style and then select the following settings:


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Frame = no frame, Light = No light leakNoise = Scratch and Vignet = none.

Hit DONE and save to camera roll (SHARE

 

We’re going to add some atmospheric blur in LoMob but we have to be a little tricksy about it. Here’s why: the screenshots below illustrate where the blur would be applied to the photograph in its original layout…  

 

I love the blur effect you get with the LoMob Tri-Black film preset BUT I want to apply it to the left-hand side of the photograph rather than the right, so that the far end of the street is out of focus, and the grunge-texture in the lower left-hand corner is softened.


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So…

import the photograph back into PhotoGene and rotate to look like this…(below left). Then we add atmospheric blur to the desired part of photograph in LoMob. 

Select CLASSIC VINTAGE> TRI-BLACK Anyone who remembers those wonderful point and click computer games MYST and RIVEN will feel a hint of nostalgia doing this next bit, because you’re looking for an invisible button.


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Touch the screen in the space shown in the screenshot (below,left).

 

Shazam! A set of buttons appear. (below, right). Use these to switch elements of the preset on and off. If you copy the settings in the screenshot above and then hit the little wheel button on the bottom left of the screen, you’ll switch off the B&W and vignette effects leaving just the blurHowever, you won’t see the blur until you render a preview by hitting the green arrow/return icon on the bottom right of the screen. 

 

 

Flip and Rotate in Photogene (dizzy? I promise this is the last time) 

I decided that I preferred the photograph’s composition in reverse from the original and so saved it like this…

 


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